Category
Exteriors

Log & Timber Homes From Coast to Coast: Northwest

The Northwest has a variety of climate areas, from the Pacific Coast to the valley and, once over the mountains, a desert region—all within a few hours drive of each other. There are spectacular mountains, clear lakes and rivers, and wide open spaces as far as the eye can see. You’ll see everything from contemporary timber frames to log homes patterned after the National Park lodges of the early 20th century. You’ll surely find your personal heaven in such a diverse region…

Timber!

The different types of construction and terms used to describe log and timber homes can be confusing to home buyers, especially when it comes to timber frame and post-and-beam homes. While the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, there are important distinctions between the two types of construction, and key questions to ask when you are planning your own home. “There are some basic similarities to post-and-beam construction and authentic timber framing,” says Stephanie Jo…

Signs of Spring

There may still be snow on the mountain peaks in some parts of North America, but there are many signs of the coming spring. The sun is warmer and the trees are sprouting new green foliage. The crocuses are blooming and the daffodils, lilies, and irises are showing signs of life. Indigenous animals are coming out of hibernation and reclaiming their territory (note the deer at the tree line in this photograph). Being a natural material, the wood of log & timber homes never looks b…

Heart & Soul

Tom Grove remembers vacations spent at the family cabin when he was a boy. Originally, his parents owned a condo in northern Wisconsin, but they decided to search for a cabin when a fire damaged their building. The one they chose was built of logs at the turn of the century as a hunting camp and remodeled in the 1950s. It was small with just two bedrooms, but they enjoyed it for many years.  “Then our family started growing, and we had more grandchildren,” says his mother, Jackie. “We decided we ne…

The Jewel in the Crown

A stunning stone patio, boulders, ornamental grasses lined up in rows, and tall, slender trees all serve to enhance the beauty of this home. An old saying tells us that the devil is in the details, but so is the dazzle! Landscaping and hardscaping your log or timber home put the finishing touch on the self-expression that motivates homeowners everywhere. Rather than an afterthought or an add-on, the exterior finish of the home and surroundings bring the vision to life and complete the journey from idea …

Welcome Home!

Front doors welcome visitors and reflect the personality of the people who live within the home. A front door can convey serenity, power, warmth, creativity, and so much more. Take some time to determine the statement you want to make and how you want your home to welcome you and your guests. And don’t forget about your interior doors: they also help create a home that reflects your personality and enhances your enjoyment of your home.

Log Cabin Homes Coast to Coast

There was a time in the not-too-distant past when regional log availability and building techniques dictated the types of homes that one could build in specific areas of the United States. Round logs were prevalent in the Northeast and in certain Midwestern states while square log homes with dovetail corners dominated in the Appalachian region, including the Virginias and the Carolinas.  Adirondack homes were large, but were made from smaller logs that are indigenous t…

Warm Weather Checkups

While warm temperatures and sunshine are the hallmarks of summer weather, the seasonal care and maintenance of a log or timber home is an ongoing effort. “Your home shelters you and your family,” says Dena Taylor of Great South Log Home Services. “Plus, it was a huge investment. Protect your home and your investment. Don’t neglect it. It will only lead to problems that may be expensive to fix. Be familiar with the exterior of your home. If you notice any changes that appear …

Big Trend: Small Homes

In November 2010, the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) reported that the median size of new home construction continued to decline during the latter half of the decade, peaking at 2,268 square feet in 2006 and settling to an even 2,100 square feet in 2009. According to the report, a similar trend occurred in the early 1980s, when interest rates climbed to astronomical heights, but this reduction in square footage was only temporary. The 1990s saw t…